Sharing some photos of the time capsule unsealing event that took place recently at the old Twelfth Street Colored Y.M.C.A. Building (now the Thurgood Marshall Center) in Washington, D.C.

Twelfth Street Colored YMCA Building time capsule unsealing

The formal ceremony in the building’s vintage gymnasium was attended by Thurgood Marshall’s 81-year-old widow, Cissy, and by the great-grandson of former president Theodore Roosevelt who presided over the laying of the cornerstone 100 years earlier.

Twelfth Street Colored YMCA Building time capsule unsealing

This Holy Bible that was inside the 100-year-old time capsule.

Twelfth Street Colored YMCA Building time capsule unsealing

The official Y.M.C.A. “Mind-Body-Spirit” emblem on a vintage lapel pin.

Twelfth Street Colored YMCA Building time capsule unsealing

Century-old newspapers, the Washington Post and the Washington Herald.

Twelfth Street Colored YMCA Building time capsule unsealing

The ticket stub from a 1908 event staged a month before the original sealing.

Twelfth Street Colored YMCA Building time capsule unsealing

The restored sitting room where Thurgood Marshall and colleagues discussed and crafted their Brown v. Topeka Board of Education arguments.

Twelfth Street Colored YMCA Building time capsule unsealing

Former D.C. Mayor Marion Barry speaks to the audience as viewers peer into the gym.

The proceedings were covered nicely by The Washington Post:

Marshall Center Holds On to History

Old and New Time Capsules Help Trace Nation’s Racial Past, Changes

By Ian Shapira
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, February 8, 2009; Page C04

Yesterday afternoon, at the old 12th Street “Colored” YMCA in the District — now the Thurgood Marshall Center for Service and Heritage — the narrative of America’s racial past and progress was celebrated in unusual style: The 81-year-old widow of the Supreme Court justice convened with the great-grandson of former president Theodore Roosevelt.

Then, a time capsule filled with Barack Obama-headlined newspapers was embedded in the historic building, a few blocks off U Street NW. And contents of the building’s recently opened 100-year-old time capsule were displayed.

“Oh, this is too much,” said Evelyn Fleming, 60, a U.S. Postal Service event coordinator, standing outside as workers removed bricks to install the new capsule.

Mary Dickson, the center’s treasurer, nodded and summoned the names of those who once walked the corridors. “If only Langston Hughes could be here,” she said. “And Thurgood Marshall.”

“They are here, in spirit,” Fleming said.

The Marshall center, which houses community groups and social service organizations, has a thing for time capsules. In November, officials unearthed a time capsule that had been buried under the building’s cornerstone 100 years ago. Yesterday, they unveiled the contents for the first time: a tattered copy of the Bible and two copies of very wide and very bland-looking newspapers, The Washington Post and the Washington Herald. (Newsstand price: three and two cents, respectively.)

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