Negro Wages In 1910s, Compared To Money Opportunities Playing Basketball

On August 6, 2008, in Business, Community, Culture, History, Race, by Black Fives Foundation

In 1916 the price for a room at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City was $2.00 to $3.00 per night. How did that compare to the average wages of Negroes back then?

Carnegie

On July 8, 2008, in Community, Culture, Race, by Claude Johnson

The immense role Andrew Carnegie played in helping support and sustain Tuskegee Institute and Booker T. Washington ties directly back to the Black Fives Era.

Monday Free Throws

On July 7, 2008, in Community, Culture, History, Relationships, by Claude Johnson

Random updates, going through the motions, but pay attention.

Special Seersucker Suit Stories

On June 16, 2008, in Culture, Family, History, Kids, Race, Relationships, by Black Fives Foundation

I’ve always wanted a seersucker suit ever since Dad gave me my grandfather’s seersucker when I graduated from college.

Hunter Johnson And The Scholastic Athletic Association of Pittsburgh

On May 13, 2008, in Community, Culture, History, NBA, Race, by Black Fives Foundation

One unsung black sports pioneer stands out among dozens who paved the way during the Black Fives Era, and that’s a remarkable brother named Hunter Johnson.

A 1920 St. Patrick’s Day Basketball Ticket, A Pimp, A Pusher, Black Magic, Labor And Politics In Pennsylvania

On March 17, 2008, in Artifacts, Community, Descendants, Motivation, Race, Venues, by Claude Johnson

The Loendi Big Five were sponsored by the Loendi Social and Literary Club, the most elite all-black club in America, formed by Pittsburgh’s most successful African Americans.

Monticello Athletic Association Puts Pittsburgh On Black Basketball Map

On January 7, 2008, in Culture, Relationships, by Black Fives Foundation

Monticello Athletic Association’s black national basketball championship in 1912 paved the way for other African American teams, by showing that determined teams from any city could win.

One Kid Held The Key: A ‘Greatest Moment’

On November 26, 2007, in Community, Culture, Motivation, Race, Relationships, Religion, by Black Fives Foundation

James “Big Jim” Dorsey, a tall 15-year-old African American janitor from the North Side section of Pittsburgh, single-handedly influenced black basketball in the early 1900s.

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Quote of the Month

“It is very seldom that the pioneer in any walk of life reaps the harvest from the seed he has sown. Ofttimes many of them even die without knowing the real good they have accomplished.”
—Lester Walton, pioneering African American sportswriter for the New York Age, 1907

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